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Christmas In Historic Chatham PDF Print E-mail

Chatham First invites all to enjoy our Christmas in Historic Chatham celebration December 4th and 5th on Main Street.  The festivities begin with the "Toast the Alley" fundraising reception at Simpson Funeral Museum at 7 pm on Thursday night and continue through the Lantern Lighting, Festival of Carols and Yule Log Celebration at 7 pm on Friday night.  The Chatham Christmas Parade hosted by Chatham Volunteer Fire Department on Saturday rounds out the opening weekend for the holidays.


Chatham First in partnership with the Chatham Beautification Committee and the Town of Chatham will host the fundraising reception on Thursday to present the conceptual design for the restoration of Competition Alley located between Simpson Funeral Museum and the PCCA building.  Guests will learn the history of the development of the alley as a part of the Town of Competition as well as plans for the alley's potential as an historic community space for the town.  Fundraising opportunities for all to participate in this project will be explained after which members of the Competition Alley Committee will be available to answer individual questions. If you are interested in learning how you can help this project succeed, please plan to attend.  A toast to the alley project will conclude the evening.


Friday night is the traditional Christmas celebration which has been a part of our town's festival since its bicentennial origin as "Christmas in Colonial Chatham”. The official lighting of the lanterns and Christmas trees, carols, holly and yule log, cider and cookies bring us all together at the courthouse to begin the holiday celebration in town.  Chatham First asks members from every church in the area who like to sing to join together as a town choir to lead the others in singing the carols printed in the program.  If you like to sing, please be ready to climb the courthouse stairs and become a part of the 2014 Christmas Choir!  Save the dates of December 4th, 5th, and 6th to come together as a community to welcome the Christmas season to our town and county.


 

 
Chatham Christmas Parade 2014 PDF Print E-mail

Tha Chatham Christmas Parade will take place Saturday, December 6, 2014 at 11:00 am.

There is no need to register. Entries can line up on North Main Street and Hurt Street near Old Dutch. For more inofrmation call Coles at 434-250-1634.

 
2013 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report PDF Print E-mail

            2013 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Town of Chatham

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for calendar year 2013 is designed to inform you about your drinking water quality.  Our goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water, and we want you to understand the efforts we make to protect your water supply.  The quality of your drinking water must meet state and federal requirements administered by the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).

 

If you have questions about this report, want additional information about any aspect of your drinking water or want to know how to participate in decisions that may affect the quality of your drinking water, please contact:

 

Town of Chatham

Mr. Robert Hanson, Public Works Director

434-432-9515

 

The times and location of regularly scheduled council meetings are as follows:

 

2nd Monday of each month at 7:30 PM – Chatham Fire Dept., 35 Depot St., Chatham, VA

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.  Contaminants in source water may be naturally occurring substances or may come from septic systems, discharges from domestic or industrial wastewater treatment facilities, agricultural and farming activities, urban stormwater runoff, residential uses, and many other types of activities.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (1) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (2) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. (3) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (4) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. (5) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

Water from surface sources is treated to make it drinkable, while groundwater may or may not have any treatment.

 

All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 

 

SOURCE AND TREATMENT OF YOUR DRINKING WATER

The source of your drinking water is surface water from Cherrystone Creek.

 Treatment of the raw water consists of chemical addition, coagulation, flocculation, settling, filtration, fluoridation, chlorination and corrosion control.  All of these processes work together to remove the physical, chemical, and biological contaminants to make the water safe for drinking.

 

A source water assessment for the Town of Chatham water supply was conducted during 2002 by the Virginia Department of Health. The source, Cherrystone Creek, was determined to have a high susceptibility to contamination using criteria developed by the State in its approved Source Water Assessment Program.  The assessment report consists of maps showing the source water assessment area, an inventory of known land use activities of concern, and documentation of any known contamination within the last 5 years. The report is available by contacting your water system representative / operator at the phone number or address provided with this drinking water quality report.

 
DEFINITIONS

Contaminants in your drinking water are routinely monitored according to federal and state regulations.  The table below shows the results of this monitoring for the period of January 1st through December 31st,2013.  In the table and elsewhere in this report you will find terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with.  The following definitions are provided to help you better understand these terms:

 

Non-detects (ND)- lab analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present, based on the limits of the analytical equipment used. 

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l)- one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or one penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter- one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or one penny in $10,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/l)- picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

 

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU)- nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the cloudiness of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person. Turbidity is monitored because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system.

Action Level (AL)- the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

 

Treatment Technique (TT)- a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

 

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG)- the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

 

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL)- the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

 

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) -the level of a drinking water disinfectant below which

there is no known or expected risk to health.  MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to

control microbial contaminants. 

 

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDL) -the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control microbial contaminants.

 

Not Applicable (NA)

 

WATER QUALITY RESULTS

We routinely monitor for various contaminants in the water supply to meet all regulatory requirements. The table below lists only those contaminants that had some level of detection.  Many other contaminants have been analyzed but were not present or were below the detection limits of the lab equipment.

 

Contaminant / Unit of Measurement

MCLG

MCL

Level Found / Range

Violation

Date of Sample

Typical Source of Contamination

Microbiological Contaminants

Turbidity

NTU

NA

 

TT= Max 1 NTU

 

Maximum - 0.11

No

Continuous & Every 2 hours in lab

Soil runoff

 

TT=95% of monthly samples must be <0.3 NTU

 

 

Lowest monthly percentage of

samples <0.3  -  100%

Total Coliform Bacteria

0

Presence of coliform bacteria in no more than 1 sample per month

No samples total coliform present

No

Routinely collect

2 per month

Naturally present in the environment

Inorganic Contaminants

Fluoride

ppm

4

4

Highest: 1.5

 

Range: 0.5 to 1.5

No

Daily

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Nitrate

ppm

10

10

<0.05

No

April 2013

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits

Barium

ppm

2

2

0.02

No

April 2013

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

Lead and Copper

Contaminant / Unit of Measurement

MCLG

MCL

Level Found / Range

Violation

Date of Sample

Typical Source of Contamination

Copper

ppm

AL = 1.3

AL = 1.3

0.042 (90thpercent)

Range: <0.02 – 0.074

Of 20 samples collected, none exceeded the AL

No

July-Dec 2013

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

Lead

Ppb

AL = 0

AL = 15

<2  (90thpercentile)

Range: <2 – 2

Of 20 samples collected, none exceeded the AL

No

July-Dec 2013

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

 

Organic Contaminants

Contaminant/Unit of Measurement

MCLG

MCL

Level Found

Violation

Date of Sample

Typical Source of Contamination

HAA5s

(Total Haloacetic Acids)

ppb

 

N/A

60

(as running 4 quarter ave)

 

Highest 4 Qtr

Ave:  45

Range:  15 – 68

 

No

Quarterly 2013

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TTHMs

(Total Trihalomethanes)

ppb

 

N/A

80

(as running 4 quarter ave)

 

Highest 4 Qtr

Ave:  57

Range:  20 – 99

 

No

Quarterly 2013

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Total Organic Carbon (TOCs)

ppm

 

 

N/A

TT - % removed during treatment; meets when removal ratio ≥1.0

Lowest 4 quarter ave removal ratio - 1.26

 

Range of monthly removal - 1.1 - 1.7

N/A

Monthly

Naturally present in the environment

Chlorine

ppm

MRDLG

= 4

MRDL = 4.0

Highest Quarterly Average - 1.5 mg/L

 

Range:  0.3 – 1.9

No

Monthly at two sites

Water additive used to control microbes

Radiological Contaminants

Contaminant / Unit of Measurement

MCLG

MCL

Level Found

Violation

Date of Sample

Typical Source of Contamination

Combined Radium

pCi/L

0

5

1

No

March 2008

Erosion of natural deposits

Alpha Emitters

pCi/L

0

15

0.2

No

March 2008

Erosion of natural deposits

Beta Emitters

pCi/L

0

50*

1.8

No

March 2008

Decay of natural and man-made deposits

*The PMCL for beta particles is 4 mrem/year. EPA considers 50 pCi/L to be the level of concern for beta particles.

 

The results in the table are from testing done in 2008 through 2013. The state allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though representative, is more than one year oldThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets MCLs at very stringent levels.  In developing the standards, EPA assumes that the average adult drinks 2 liters of water each day throughout a 70-year life span.  EPA generally sets MCLs at levels that will result in no adverse health effects for some contaminants or a one-in-ten-thousand to one-in-one-million chance of having the described health effect for other contaminants.

 

INFORMATION ABOUT LEAD IN DRINKING WATER

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Town of Chatham is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 15 to 30 seconds or until it becomes cold or reaches a steady temperature before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (Tel # 1-800-426-4791) or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

Since the 2012 lead Action Level (AL) exceedance, the Town has returned to compliance with lead and copper monitoring related requirements. The previous lead Action Level exceedance did not constitute a violation, but it did require the Town to follow actions to reduce lead levels and optimize corrosion control treatment. The Town switched to a different corrosion inhibitor (added at the water treatment plant) and optimized the dosage added to the water. In 2013, the Town completed two 6-month follow up sampling periods (January to June and July to December) and was below the Action Level in each of these sampling periods.  The latest monitoring during November 2013 indicated all locations sampled were well below the action level of 15 ppb (highest was 2 ppb).  Additional monitoring is required during 2014 and the Town will keep its customers notified of the monitoring results.

 

OTHER DRINKING WATER CONSTITUENTS

 

In the compliance samples collected during April 2013, the sodium content was determined to be 12 ppm, which is below the maximum recommended level of 20 ppm by EPA.  The recommended level was established for those individuals on a sodium-restricted diet.  If you have any concerns about the sodium level in your drinking water, you may wish to consult with your physician.  Aluminum was detected at a concentration of 0.05 ppm, which is within the Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level range of 0.05 – 0.2 ppm.  This limit is established to minimize potential aesthetic (color) affects associated with aluminum when above the recommended limit. The manganese concentration was determined to be <0.01 ppm which is below the Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level of 0.05 ppm.  Manganese is a naturally occurring mineral in many surface and ground water sources and in soils that may erode into these waters.  This mineral is not considered a health concern; however, its presence above the Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level can result in aesthetic problems affecting the clarity and taste of the water as well as staining of plumbing fixtures.

 
Chatham Offers a New Way to Make Payments PDF Print E-mail

The Town of Chatham announces a new and convenient way for residents to make thier payments. Beginning Febraury 3rd, real estate tax, personal property tax, Town utitlities and ticket/fine payments may be paid online. The Town has contracted with Official Payments, a leading provider of electronic payment solutions to offer payment processing over the internet at www.OfficialPayments.com

Visa Discover and Mastercard debit and credit cards are accepted as well as electronic checks. This new service offers customers a fast, easy way to pay online so they can reap the benefits of convenience, cash managment and card card rewards.

 
Delinquent Chatham taxpayers face DMV stops, Treasurer warns PDF Print E-mail

On Nov. 1, the Town of Chatham will begin participating in the Vehicle Registration Withholding (DMV stop) Program as authorized by the Code of Virginia.

Through the DMV stop program, Chatham will ask the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles to withhold registration or registration renewals for any taxpayer who owes delinquent taxes, penalties, interest, and fees to the town.

Once a DMV stop has been placed on an account, the taxpayer must pay the entire amount due with certified funds (cash, money order, or cashier’s check) to get the stop removed, Clerk-Treasurer Tim Hammell said.

An additional processing fee of $40 per vehicle will be added to any funds owed to the town, Hammell added.

 

 
Chatham Cruise-In PDF Print E-mail

The popular Chatham Cruise-In's are jointly sponsored by the Virginia-Carolina Chevy Car Club & Chatham First which are slated to resume in April 2015. The events are held on the 4th Saturday of each month from April through October typically starting at 4 pm to approximately 8 pm, depending on daylight & weather conditions. The event attracts usually over 300 classic cars in the downtown area of Chatham where Main Street is blocked & becomes a pleasnt promenade for all who enjoy viewing beautiful automobiles. Plan on attending these events & help support the Town, our businesses & volunteer groups. Admission is free!

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